LATEST BLOG POSTS

Project Voyager – A Map to Navigate our Dynamic Universe

posted by Zach Fejes on December 10, 2014

This is an excerpt taken from a recent article by Zachary Fejes on Discovery Space News. The full article on Discovery can be found here.   “Indulge me, for a moment, in a brief thought experiment. You have just become the pilot of a modern spacecraft, let’s call it the USS Lucky, docked with the […]



Interstellar Comparisons

posted by Adam Crowl on October 1, 2014

Travelling to the stars within a human lifetime via the known laws of physics requires energies millions of times more potent than a trip to Mars, for example. In our energy hungry modern world the prospect seems fanciful, yet we are surrounded by energies and forces of comparable scale. By taming those forces we will […]



ISDC – Round Up

posted by Jessica Riley on June 2, 2014

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A couple of weeks ago I attended the International Space Development Conference in LA. This was my first time attending the conference and I found it had a lot to offer. Many people involved with Icarus were present, gave talks, and generally provided thoughtful discussion in the sessions. My professional experience is heavily involved with creating […]



Start of the True Space Age

posted by Adam Crowl on May 7, 2014

Adam Crowl

Watching the recent soft splashdown of Space Exploration Technology’s (SpaceX’s) Falcon-9 First Stage I felt that I was witnessing an almost historic moment. Almost. When the first SpaceX Falcon achieves a soft-landing on land, then we’ll know that the real beginning of the Space Age has arrived. Widespread use of a reusable first stage will […]



Enceladus

posted by Kostas Konstantinidis on April 30, 2014

Enceladus, only about 500 km in diameter and once believed too small to be active, has been found one of the most geologically dynamic objects in the Solar System. An icy moon of Saturn, it is considered along with Jupiter’s Europa one of the prime targets for the search for life in the solar system. […]



A Plumber’s Guide to Starships Part 2: Gases in Pipes

posted by Michel Lamontagne on April 15, 2014

  In this section, we will mainly be looking at gases in pipes from the heat transfer point of view.  Although there are plenty of other reasons to move gases around in a starship, starting with fuel feed, for example, heat transfer covers the most complicated cases. The information will be applicable to simpler problems. […]



A Plumber’s Guide to Starships Part 1: Liquids

posted by Michel Lamontagne on March 21, 2014

Part 1 : Liquids in Pipes   Moving liquids around is hardly new technology – even if it’s in a starship. Pretty much all of the design tools were worked out in the eighteenth century, and the most recent developments – magnetic pumps for liquid metals – date back to the 1960s.  However, it is […]



The Challenge of Relativistic Spaceflight

posted by Adam Crowl on March 3, 2014

Adam Crowl

Riding a Beam to the Stars   The stars are, at minimum, tens of thousands of times further away than the planets. Presently flights to the planets take a year or more, thus to reach the stars in years, rather than millennia, requires speeds tens of thousands of times faster – a large fraction of […]



Starship Radiators

posted by Michel Lamontagne on February 2, 2014

Looking at the Daedalus starship, it might appear at first glance that the ship has no radiators.  So why have these cumbersome appendages suddenly reappeared on the Icarus starships?  Are they absolutely required?  And if so, how do we design them, and how much of a mass penalty will they add to the ship?   […]



Fusion Propulsion: Reaching the Stars by Wielding the Power of the Stars

posted by Guest on July 23, 2013

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The following blog is a guest post from Kevin Schillo who is currently pursuing a Master of Science in Aerospace Systems Engineering at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. His research is focusing on pulsed fusion propulsion, which could help to open up the solar system for routine manned exploration. Kevin has always had a […]